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Fratelli d'Italia

The "Canto degli Italiani" (or Inno di Mameli) is the national anthem of the Italian Republic, adopted since 12 October 1946.
It was written in the fall of 1847 by Goffredo Mameli (1827-1849) who sent it to composer Michele Novaro, who wrote the music in one night; the song could make its debut on December 10 1847, on the forecourt of the Shrine of Our Lady of Loreto Oregina, to celebrate the centennial of the expulsion of the Austrians from Genoa, in front of 30,000 people. After a few days, everyone knew the anthem that was sung in every event, becoming a symbol of the Risorgimento.

When the anthem was spread, authorities tried to ban it, considering it subversive (because of anti-monarchical and republican inspiration of the author); since the attempt proved a failure, they tried at least to censor the final part, extremely hard with the Austrians, but even here they failed.

After the declaration of war against Austria in 1848, military bands played it on any occasion, so that the King was forced to withdraw all the complaints of the text. Later it was the anthem that Garibaldi, when with his "Thousand" he began the conquest of southern Italy. Mameli was dead by that time, but the words of his song, which called for a united Italy, were more alive than ever.

The author: Goffredo Mameli

Goffredo Mameli of Mannelli, better known simply as Goffredo Mameli, was born in Genoa (at the time Kingdom of Sardinia) on September 5, 1827 and died as a result of an infected wound in the siege of Rome on July 6 1849, at the age of 23. Among the heroes of the Italian Risorgimento, he is the author of the words of the Italian national anthem.

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Fratelli d'Italia,
l'Italia s'è desta,
dell'elmo di Scipio
s'è cinta la testa.
Brethrens of Italy,
Italy has awakened,
the helmet of Scipio
has bound her head.
 
Dov'è la Vittoria?
Le porga la chioma,
ché schiava di Roma
Iddio la creò.
Where is Victory?
Victory will bow her head,
since a slave of Rome
God made her.
 
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte.
Siam pronti alla morte,
l'Italia chiamò.
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte.
Siam pronti alla morte,
l'Italia chiamò!
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death.
We're ready for death,
Italy has called!
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death.
We're ready for death,
Italy has called!
 
Noi fummo da secoli
calpesti, derisi,
perché non siam popolo,
perché siam divisi.
We were for centuries
Downtrodden and derided,
because we are not one people,
because we are divided.
 
Raccolgaci un'unica
bandiera, una speme:
di fonderci insieme
già l'ora suonò.
Let's be united by
one flag, one hope
to be united
already the hour has struck.
 
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte [...]
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death [...]
 
Uniamoci, amiamoci,
l'unione e l'amore
rivelano ai popoli
le vie del Signore.
Let us unite and love one another,
unity and love
Show the people
God's ways.
 
Giuriamo far libero
il suolo natio:
uniti, per Dio,
chi vincer ci può?
Let us swear to free
Our native soil;
United, by God,
Who can defeat us?
 
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte [...]
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death [...]
 
Dall'Alpi a Sicilia
Dovunque è Legnano,
Ogn'uom di Ferruccio
Ha il core, ha la mano,
From the Alps to Sicily
everywhere is Legnano,
Every man of Ferruccio
Has the heart, has the hand
 
I bimbi d'Italia
Si chiaman Balilla,
Il suon d'ogni squilla
I Vespri suonò.
The children of Italy
are called Balilla,
The sound of each bell
tolled the Vespers.
 
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte [...]
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death [...]
 
Son giunchi che piegano
Le spade vendute:
Già l'Aquila d'Austria
Le penne ha perdute.
Reeds are bending
the sold Swords:
Already the Eagle of Austria
Has lost its feathers.
 
Il sangue d'Italia,
Il sangue Polacco,
Bevé, col cosacco,
Ma il cor le bruciò.
The blood of Italy,
The Polish blood
She drank with the Cossack
But it burned her heart.
 
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte.
Siam pronti alla morte,
l'Italia chiamò.
Stringiamci a coorte,
siam pronti alla morte.
Siam pronti alla morte,
l'Italia chiamò!
Sì!
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death.
We're ready for death,
Italy has called!
Let us unite in a cohort,
We are ready for death.
We're ready for death,
Italy has called!
Yes!